Digital Life Vol 3 No 23

TechSpace [Vol-3, Issue-26]

TechSpace [Vol-3, Issue-26] FB by Thit Htoo Lwin

TechSpace [Vol-3, Issue-26]

Reporter News Journal Issue - 89

Reporter News Journal Issue - 89 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Reporter News Journal Issue - 89

Myanmar Business Today Vol 2, Issue 38 - September 25-OCTOBER 1, 2014

Myanmar Business Today Vol 2, Issue 38 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Myanmar Business Today Vol 2, Issue 38 - September 25-OCTOBER 1, 2014

Myanmar Times (English) Issue 748 | SEPTEMBER 29 - OCTOBERS 5,2014

201438748 by The Myanmar Times

Myanmar Times (English) Issue 748 | SEPTEMBER 29 - OCTOBERS 5,2014

Mobile Guide Journal Issue 172

Mobile Guide Issue 172 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Mobile Guide Journal Issue 172

Myanma Alinn Daily_ 30 September 2014 Newpapers

30.Sept_.14_mal by Thit Htoo Lwin

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Union Daily_ 30 September 2014 Newpapers

The Street View Journal Vol-3,Issue-37

The Street View Journal Vol-3,Issue-37 by Thit Htoo Lwin

The Street View Journal Vol-3,Issue-37

The Mirror Daily_ 29 September 2014 Newpapers

29.Sep_.14_km by Thit Htoo Lwin

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Myanma Alinn Daily_ 29 September 2014 Newpapers

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Union Daily (29-9-2014) by Thit Htoo Lwin

Union Daily_ 29 September 2014 Newpapers

Myanmar monk backs hard-line Buddhist group

Wirathu says will work with the BBS to protect their common religion, currently 'under threat'

Controversial Buddhist monk from Myanmar Ashin Wirathu, accused of leading an anti-Muslim movement in Burma, on Sunday pledged his support to a hard-line Sinhala-Buddhist group in Sri Lanka which faces similar allegations.

Speaking at the convention of the Bodu Bala Sena (BBS), roughly Buddhist Power Force when translated, Wirathu said he would work with the BBS to protect their common religion that, he said, was facing threats from Islamic jihadists, according to media reports.

The BBS, besides leading a campaign against halal certification last year, allegedly played a role in attacks against Muslim-owned establishments in Sri Lanka. The BBS has denied involvement and the Sri Lanka government — accused of supporting the organisation — has also denied backing the BBS.

In June this year, a violent clash between Buddhists and Muslims broke out in Aluthgama, a southwestern coastal town about 60 km south of Colombo, following a provocative speech by BBS leader Galagoda-Atte Gnanasara Thera.

Often accused of making hate speeches, Buddhist monk Wirathu at Sunday’s meeting said his movements would join hands with the BBS to protect and defend the “threatened Buddhist” the world over, according to news agency AFP.

‘Thankful to Rajapaksa’
He said Muslim extremists had tried to scuttle his visit to Sri Lanka, that shares cultural and religious links with Myanmar.

“I am thankful to the President [Mahinda Rajapakse] for granting me a visa in spite of attempts by Muslim extremists to prevent my visit,” he said.

The Muslim Council of Sri Lanka had warned the authorities that allowing Wirathu to visit “would pose a serious threat to peace in our beloved motherland”.

Sri Lanka Muslim Congress — a political party aligned to the Mahinda Rajapaksa-led coalition — sought special protection ahead of the meeting to ensure safety of citizens.

The controversial monk’s visit comes at a time when Sri Lanka faces a U.N. resolution calling for a probe into its rights record. The Human Rights Council and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has also repeatedly underlined religious intolerance as an issue of serious concern in Sri Lanka.

BBS leader Galagodaatte Gnanasara said both of them were “peaceful monks with no blood on our hands”, according to AFP.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/south-asia/myanmar-monk-backs-hardline-buddhist-group/article6455218.ece?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=RSS_Syndication


Thai rescue helicopter missing in Myanmar

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — A rescue helicopter from Thailand has lost contact with ground control during a search for two climbers who scaled Southeast Asia's highest peak a month ago, officials said Sunday.

The helicopter was carrying three people, including a Thai pilot.

According to Htoo Foundation, the chopper left Putao airport in Myanmar's northern Kachin state on Saturday to drop food for a team searching for two Myanmar climbers missing since Aug. 31. The foundation is leading the search effort for the climbers.

An eight-member team set out to climb the 5,881-meter (19,300-foot) Hkakabo Razi mountain last month, but only two went up the final stretch due to the narrow nature of the summit, reaching the ice-capped mountaintop on Aug. 31.

The men reported before making their descent that their radio battery was weak. They were supposed to reconnect with their colleagues at base camp on Sept. 9, but did not show up.

The search for the climbers involved helicopters from Thailand, the U.S. and China, as well as other mountaineers.

http://news.yahoo.com/thai-rescue-helicopter-missing-myanmar-040828577.html


Pyimyanmar Journal No 940

Pyimyanmar Journal No 940 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Pyimyanmar Journal No 940

Good Health No 506

gh506-s by Thit Htoo Lwin

Good Health No 506

Myanma Alinn Daily_ 28 September 2014 Newpapers

28.Sept_.14_mal by Thit Htoo Lwin

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The Mirror Daily_ 28 September 2014 Newpapers

28.Sep_.14_KM by Thit Htoo Lwin

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Union Daily_ 28 September 2014 Newpapers

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Union Daily_ 28 September 2014 Newpapers

Myanmar Than Taw Sint Vol 3 No 29

Vol-3,No-29 by MyanmarThandawsint

Myanmar Than Taw Sint Vol 3 No 29

Myanma Alinn Daily_ 27 September 2014 Newpapers

27.Sept_.14_mal by Thit Htoo Lwin

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Myanmar Times (Myan) Vol 35 No 691

201435691 by The Myanmar Times

Myanmar Times (Myan) Vol 35 No 691

Union Daily_ 27 September 2014 Newpapers

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Euro Sports Vol 5 No 26

Euro Sports Vol 5 No 26 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Euro Sports Vol 5 No 26

Sport View Journal Vol 3 No 38

Sport View Journal Vol 3 No 38 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Sport View Journal Vol 3 No 38

Good Health No 505

Good Health No 505 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Good Health No 505

NCCT and Government Team's 6th Ceasefire Talks Conclude

NCCT and Government Team's 6th Ceasefire Talks Conclude

Parliament on Budget Issue and Quality of Construction: MPs' Views

Parliament on Budget Issue and Quality of Construction: MPs' Views

Report Myanmar's NLD May Support Ruling Party Chief For President 'Incorrect'

Myanmar’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) party on Wednesday distanced itself from reports that it may back the ruling party’s chief Shwe Mann as a presidential candidate in next year’s general election.

Aung San Suu Kyi said a Reuters news agency report indicating party support for Shwe Mann—the current speaker of the lower house with the ruling Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) and former number three in the country’s military regime—was “incorrect.”

Other senior NLD officials said that the party would not support any form of rule that comes from a military-backed government and that it would consider backing a non-NLD candidate if the person’s views represented the party’s interests.

Earlier on Wednesday, Reuters news agency reported that the NLD planned to enter the 2015 parliamentary election “with no candidate for president,” citing party officials, one of whom had said it might even support Shwe Mann.

Reuters said Aung San Suu Kyi was “apparently unwilling to give her blessing to an alternative candidate from within her own party” and cited NLD executive committee member Nyan Win as saying that Shwe Mann, while controversial, may be the most viable candidate for the party to support.

The report also cited Han Tha Myint, another member of the NLD's executive committee, as saying that the party would support a non-NLD candidate who shared its views, without specifying who that candidate might be.

Later on Wednesday, Aung San Suu Kyi denied that the two senior NLD members had suggested the party would back Shwe Mann.

“They didn’t say it like that. The news is incorrect. Please read the news carefully. After you read it, then ask the concerned people [Nyan Win and Han Tha Myint],” she told RFA’s Myanmar Service.

“The news I saw wasn’t like that. The persons concerned have already spoken. You can ask them [what they said].”

Myanmar’s Eleven news media quoted Aung San Suu Kyi as saying that “she found the statements and the controversial way they were strung together unbelievable.”

“I don’t believe it,” Eleven quoted the NLD leader as saying in reference to the Reuters report.

Nyan Win told RFA on Wednesday that he was confused about why the report suggested he had said the NLD would back Shwe Mann.

“The reporter asked me something about that and I replied to him that it was impossible, because neither the people nor the NLD like to see generals change from their military uniforms into civilian dress, but he wrote that the NLD supports Shwe Mann for president in the 2015 election,” he said.

“As NLD members, how could we support another person for presidency? We wouldn’t support the kind of governance system that comes from a military government.”

The NLD has been calling for a number of amendments to articles in the junta-backed 2008 constitution it views as undemocratic, including to Article 59(F), which prohibits Aung San Suu Kyi from becoming president because her two sons are not citizens of Myanmar.

Nyan Win said that the NLD has considered someone from the party to run as a presidential candidate in next year’s election if the article is not amended and Aung San Suu Kyi is barred from running.

‘No second person’

Han Tha Myint told Eleven that he never mentioned Shwe Mann’s name during his interview with Reuters, saying only that the NLD would consider supporting a nonparty candidate if the person’s views aligned with its views.

“They asked who will be the presidential candidate for the NLD if Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is still blocked by [Article] 59(F). There is no second person beside her in the NLD,” the report quoted him as saying.

“Then, they asked who the NLD will nominate. I said the candidate for president does not need to be an MP; he or she might be from any political party. He doesn’t need to be from the NLD.”

Speaking to the Democratic Voice of Burma, Han Tha Myint said that while backing another party is conceivable in the absence of a popular and eligible contender, the media may have jumped the gun.

“It’s a hypothetical situation right now and I don’t want to speculate,” he told the Voice.

The NLD urged Reuters on Wednesday to resolve the discrepancy in its report.

USDP lawmaker Zaw Myint Pe also questioned the report, saying that his party had not even made a decision on who it would put forward as a candidate for the nation’s top post.

“The upcoming election is still one year away from now—we haven’t even considered who will be chosen as a presidential candidate for our party. Ahead of the election we must hold a party conference, during which we will discuss the issue,” he told RFA.

“I don’t think that information [about backing Shwe Mann] was officially announced by the NLD.”

2015 elections

Next year’s parliamentary elections will be the first since President Thein Sein’s quasi-civilian government took power from the former military regime in 2011, initiating sweeping democratic reforms that have been widely lauded in the West.

It will also mark the first general elections to be contested by the NLD, which won a 1990 vote in a landslide victory that the military refused to accept. A 2010 election was boycotted by the NLD while Aung San Suu Kyi was under house arrest.

The NLD enjoys a huge popular following, but must contend with the military-backed USDP in parliament, which chooses the president under Myanmar’s political system. A clause in the country’s charter guarantees that 25 percent of the seats in the lower house are filled by military MPs.

Shwe Mann and Aung San Suu Kyi have cooperated in parliament, and the former general has suggested he would cooperate with the NLD leader if the constitution was amended to allow her to run and she was to win the presidency.

However, despite an NLD petition calling for the removal of an effective military veto over changes to the charter which garnered five million signatures, the USDP appears unlikely to support the move, meaning it is highly unlikely that Aung San Suu Kyi will be able to contend the presidency.

Another clause in the charter, Article 59(D), states that the president of Myanmar “shall be well acquainted with the affairs of the Union such as political, administrative, economic, and military.”

The article is widely interpreted to mean that the president would have had to have served in Myanmar’s army, which Aung San Suu Kyi has not done.

Reported by Myo Thant Khine and Nay Rein Kyaw for RFA’s Myanmar Service. Translated by Khet Mar. Written in English by Joshua Lipes.

http://www.rfa.org/english/news/myanmar/report-09242014180945.html

Aung San Suu Kyi (L) poses with Shwe Mann (R) at the lower house parliament office in Naypyidaw, Dec. 23, 2011. AFP

Myanmar: 109 child soldiers discharged from army

Myanmar has held its biggest discharge of child soldiers from its army ranks. But the UN says boys are still being illegally recruited from poor families by the government and rebels.

Bertrand Bainvel, head of the UN Children’s Fund in Myanmar, said the release of children has been stepped up over the last 11 or 12 months.

“The larger numbers of underage recruitment is happening in Tatmadaw and smaller armies from non-state actors (rebels). Having said that it is clear for us that the non-state armies have exactly the same obligation,” said Bainvel.

He said the military wants to professionalise its ranks but the presence of child soldiers could block military cooperation with countries that could provide assistance.

Many young recruits are hired using forged documents, and most are from families that need the income that a son in the army can provide.

euronews
http://www.euronews.com/2014/09/25/myanmar-109-child-soldiers-discharged-from-army/

Politics, sanctions undermine Myanmar investment message

[NEW YORK] The rapid economic transformation of Myanmar, less than two years after transitioning from military control and opening itself to the world, is not without its rough patches, the nation's top economic minister said on Wednesday.

At the same time, George Soros, one of the earliest investors in Myanmar's economy and even more so its social reform, said he was troubled by the slowdown in reforms ahead of next year's elections. Still, he believes multinational companies must be involved in one of Southeast Asia's last untapped areas.

Soe Thane, Myanmar's Coordinating Minister for Economic Development, oversees roughly 11 different economic ministries. The former commander of the Myanmar Navy likened the reform process to driving on a potholed street.

Describing a complicated web of land ownership rules and regulations, he expressed hope it would be fixed in the next year. "I think we will have a comprehensive umbrella law on land policy and land use within six months to a year," Mr Soe Thane told Reuters on the sidelines of a Myanmar investment conference. "And after that, we have to go for water reform. It's a big issue for agriculture, forestry, industrial development."

http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/premium/world/politics-sanctions-undermine-myanmar-investment-message-20140926

Mr Soe Thane: I think we'll have a comprehensive umbrella law on land policy and land use in 6-12 months. After that, we have to go for water reform. It's a big issue for agriculture, forestry, industrial development. - SPH FILE PHOTO

At Least a Dozen Killed, 100 Wounded in Bugur Riots in Xinjiang

Chinese security forces on guard in Moyu county in Hotan prefecture, northwest China's Xinjiang region, Aug. 3, 2014. AFP
At least a dozen people, including three policemen, were killed and about 100 injured in attacks targeting government buildings and police stations in a southern prefecture of China’s restive Xinjiang region at the weekend, local officials and eyewitnesses said, as details of the violence emerged Thursday.

The Xinjiang government's Tianshan web portal had said on Monday that two people were killed in the Sept. 21 bomb attacks by suspected Uyghurs on at least three locations in Bugur (in Chinese, Luntai) county in the Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture.

But local officials and witnesses told RFA’s Uyghur Service that the violence had caused higher casualties.

They said the raids on the Bugur city center and the townships of Yengisar and Terekbazar had left at least 12 people dead, including three policemen and seven attackers.

All of them were killed during the bomb attack at a police station in Yengisar, the sources said. The number of fatalities in Bugur and Terekbazar was not immediately know, they said.

The Bugur county hospital has been crammed with patients with serious injuries, a nurse said, in the latest violence to rock Xinjiang, which has seen more than 200 deaths in attacks the past year.

“I assume there are about 100 people with injuries because all the hospital beds are occupied right now,” the nurse said.

Among those undergoing treatment were up to 20 policemen, as well as one suspected attacker, she said.

The raids were believed to have been staged by disgruntled ethnic minority Uyghurs, who claim to have long suffered ethnic discrimination, oppressive religious controls, and continued poverty and joblessness, sources said.

A curfew has been imposed in the affected areas, with schools and offices closed as of late Tuesday, according to Aklikim, the secretary of the ruling Chinese Communist Party branch in Bartoghraq village in Terekbazar.

“The explosions are all related to attacks on government buildings and police stations,” he said.

Stabbed

Amangul Mollaq, the aunt of policeman Nijat Ehet, who was seriously injured in the raid on the police station in Yengisar, said he had gone to investigate an explosion when he was stabbed by one of the attackers.

“When he heard the explosion, he went to the site and saw the gate of the police station being ripped off by the blast and a group of people attacking the station from the front and back of the building,” she said.

“When my nephew was dispersing the crowd, one of the attackers stabbed him,” Mollaq said. “He was only able to convey a few details as his condition was severe.”

Police officers who visited him at the hospital told Mollaq that "three suspects who staged the attack on the police station from the front and three attackers who came from the back of the building were killed on the spot."  

"I also heard that two policemen with the names Husenjan [Osman] and Ibrahim had been killed in action.”

Another police assistant, who was not identified, was among the three policemen who died in the raid, sources said.

Morgue mobbed

Qadir Osman, a Communist Party cadre in Yengisar and whose brother, a restaurant owner, was among those killed in the attacks, said the township morgue was mobbed by relatives and friends of those who perished.

“The place was surrounded by police and there were about 100 people, some of whom were waiting to identify the bodies,” he said.

Osman, whose younger brother was shot dead, said that among those at the morgue was a Han Chinese woman who told him that her husband was “crushed” by a motor vehicle during the attack.

A teacher in Yengisar, who declined to be identified, said he witnessed police cars, motorcycles, and a gas station being torched.

He said that he believed that the attackers, particularly in Bugur county center, were Uyghurs disgruntled by mass forced evictions to make way for the influx of Han Chinese.

Reported by Shohret Hoshur and Eset Sulaiman for RFA’s Uyghur Service. Translated by Mamatjan Juma. Written in English by Parameswaran Ponnudurai.

With Suu Kyi blocked, her Myanmar party eyes ex-general for president

YANGON: Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) will go into next year’s parliamentary election in Myanmar with no candidate for president and might even support a former general from the pro-military ruling party, NLD officials said.

Nobel Peace Prize winner Suu Kyi, 69, is barred by the constitution from becoming president and is apparently unwilling to give her blessing to an alternative candidate from within her own party.

One senior member of Suu Kyi’s party said it might give its backing for Shwe Mann, speaker of parliament and chairman of the ruling Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP), to be put forward for the presidency. The USDP is made up of former military officers.

But that would risk angering many rank-and-file NLD members, including many who were imprisoned by the military. It could risk undermining support for the country’s most popular party and its leader.

“We believe there is no number two position in our party,” Han Tha Myint, a member of the NLD’s executive committee, told Reuters when asked why the party would not put up its own candidate.

“No one is second to Aung San Suu Kyi.”

Suu Kyi, who spent nearly two decades under house arrest for her efforts to promote democracy, is ineligible for the presidency under the constitution, drafted during military rule, which bars candidates with a foreign child or spouse. Her late husband was British, as are her two sons. Next year’s parliamentary elections will be the first since President Thein Sein embarked on landmark reforms in 2011, dismantling the control of the military which had ruled since seizing power in a 1962 coup. It will also be the first general election the NLD has contested since it swept a 1990 vote that the military ignored. The party boycotted a 2010 election held under military rule when Suu Kyi was under house arrest.

Under Myanmar’s political system, parliament chooses the president. With a quarter of lower house seats filled by military men, the military-backed USDP is bound to be a force to reckon with no matter how well Suu Kyi’s party does.

The NLD, if it does not put up its own candidate, could decide to use its votes in bargaining with the USDP, rather than risk putting up a candidate of its own who could well be defeated by the combined votes of USDP and the military bloc.

Shwe Mann and Suu Kyi have cooperated in parliament and seem to have established good relations. The former general is seen as more pragmatic than some of his senior party colleagues and even hinted he might support amending the constitution to allow Suu Kyi to be a candidate for president.

“She’s the most popular person in the party. She favours him,” said Nyan Win, an NLD executive committee member.

The NLD collected 5 million signatures around the country to press the ruling party to revise the constitution to remove the military’s veto over changes to the constitution, including the clause that prevents Suu Kyi, the daughter of the country’s independence hero, General Aung San, from becoming president.

But there appears to be little hope that the ruling party, which is supported by the military, will allow an amendment to a constitution that gives the military veto powers.

That means Suu Kyi would appear to have no chance of being a candidate for president in 2015. She won a seat in parliament in a 2012 by-election.

Han Tha Myint said instead of putting its own candidate up for president, the NLD would support a non-NLD candidate who shared the party’s views. “He doesn’t have to be NLD, but he must think like us,” Han Tha Myint said. “The important thing is that there is someone we can accept as president. For us, that’s enough.”

Reuters
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/foreign/25-Sep-2014/with-suu-kyi-blocked-her-myanmar-party-eyes-ex-general-for-president


90:00 Minutes Sports Vol 6 No 38

90 Minutes Vol.06, No.38 by Thit Htoo Lwin

90:00 Minutes Sports Vol 6 No 38

Auto World Journal Vol 3 Issue 37

Auto World Vol 3 Issue 37 by Thit Htoo Lwin

Auto World Journal Vol 3 Issue 37

Myanma Alinn Daily_ 26 September 2014 Newpapers

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Union Daily_ 26 September 2014 Newpapers

Farmers Protest over Grabbed Lands in Sinbaungwe

Farmers Protest over Grabbed Lands in Sinbaungwe

Interview With Pa-O Activist Khun Kham Kao

Interview With Pa-O Activist Khun Kham Kao

iPhone 6 Plus Bend Test

iPhone 6 Plus Bend Test

Cambodia, Australia Set to Sign Contentious Refugee Accord

Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop (L) meets with her Cambodian counterpart Hor Namhong (R) during talks in Phnom Penh, Feb. 22, 2014.  RFA
Cambodia and Australia are set to sign an agreement this week allowing refugees detained while heading for Australia to be sent instead to Cambodia, despite concerns voiced by rights groups that the impoverished Southeast Asian nation is ill-prepared to care for them.

Australian Minister of Immigration and Border Protection Scott Morrison will travel to Cambodia on Friday to sign the Memorandum of Understanding “relating to the Settlement of Refugees in Cambodia,” Cambodia’s foreign ministry said in a statement Wednesday.

The signing ceremony will be held at Cambodia’s Ministry of Interior on Friday, the statement said.

U.S.-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) Asian division director Phil Robertson slammed the move.

“We think that ultimately Australia is playing a game by trying to rid itself of certain refugees that it finds undesirable, and that they are dumping them on Cambodia,” Robertson told RFA’s Khmer Service on Wednesday.

“We don’t have a great deal of faith in the political commitment of Cambodia to protect refugees,” he said, adding, “This is not a government that is known for its charitable acts or its humanitarian protection.”

Australia 'not listening'

HRW has tried “very hard behind the scenes” to persuade the Australian government that the proposed arrangement with Cambodia violates commitments Australia has made under the 1951 UNHCR Refugee Convention, Robertson said.

“But our pleas have fallen on deaf ears. The Australian government is simply not listening to anybody about this.”

Robertson noted, too, that no one outside the Australian and Cambodian governments has yet seen the full terms of the agreement between the two countries.

“So it’s a little bit unclear what is being agreed to here,” he said.

HRW will continue to monitor the well-being of people who are resettled under the terms of the deal, Robertson said.

Concerns rejected

The Cambodian government rejected HRW’s concerns on Wednesday, calling the rights group’s criticisms “dreams” and saying that the country is fully capable of caring for asylum-seekers who are sent there.

“Only Cambodia knows what it can do,” foreign ministry spokesman Kuy Koung told RFA. “The government has conducted thorough studies to find out if we are able to provide shelter for refugees.”

Only those refugees who volunteer to be sent to Cambodia or who are accepted on the basis of “humanitarian” need will be taken, though, he said, while declining to provide details on how many might be accepted or where they will be sent.

Asylum-seekers—many coming from Malaysia and Indonesia—seeking entry to Australia by boat are now sent to Papua New Guinea and the remote Pacific island of Nauru to be screened.

Australia has refused to accept the return of anyone found to have refugee status, though, claiming it is pursuing a “regional burden-sharing solution,” HRW said in a press statement Wednesday, adding that as of Aug. 31, 1,233 asylum-seekers were being held at Nauru.

However, Cambodia itself is unsuitable as a destination for resettlement, HRW said, noting that refugees and asylum-seekers living in the country without employment, language skills, or social networks are at “particular risk.”

“For instance, Human Rights Watch has documented the arbitrary arrest, detention, and mistreatment of ‘undesirables’ housed in squalid detention centers run by the Social Welfare Ministry, where beatings, torture, and rapes by guards go unpunished,” the rights group said.

Investigation promised

The opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) lawmaker Eng Chhay Eang—chairman of the National Assembly’s (parliament’s) human rights panel —said that it would investigate the deal.

“Cambodia is not qualified to accept refugees yet,” he said. “We are having financial and human rights problems.”

“If we find out that there is a problem with the deal, we will summon the government to question them.”

A spokeswoman for Morrison confirmed the meeting in Phnom Penh on Friday, saying "further details will be provided following the signing of an agreement," the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper reported.

It is understood the resettlement deal will be for up to 1,000 asylum seekers who are found to be refugees, the paper said.

"We are world renowned for what we do on refugee resettlement, so who better is placed than Australia to work with a country such as Cambodia to help them develop that capability to do the job as well," it quoted Morrison as saying recently.

"If we say they're not supposed to be involved in refugee resettlement, then I'm not quite sure who is."

Cambodia itself saw an exodus of refugees fleeing war and starvation during the bloody Khmer Rouge regime in the late 1970s.

Reported and translated by Samean Yun for RFA’s Khmer Service. Written in English by Richard Finney.

Parliament Commission on Farmland Problem: MPs' View

Parliament Commission on Farmland Problem: MPs' View

Digital Life Vol 3 No 22

Netguide Vol (3) , Issue (53)

Netguide Vol (3) , Issue (53) by Thit Htoo Lwin

Netguide Vol (3) , Issue (53)

Tech Space Vol 3 No 25

TechSpace [Vol 3, Issue 25] by Thit Htoo Lwin

Tech Space Vol 3 No 25

Myanma Alinn Daily_ 25 September 2014 Newpapers

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